Choosing A Lab Coat

1Lab coats aren't just for wearing in a medical or a scientific setting. While many people wear them in a hospital when they are drawing blood or when they are working with patients with the risk of getting fluids on the clothing or the body, lab coats can also be worn in a professional manner. Teachers can wear them so that they appear as dedicated as possible to the position. Some wear the coats while painting at home or in a gallery to keep paint from getting on the clothes. There are various sizes as children can get a coat to wear if they want to pretend to have a career in the medical field or if they like participating in arts and crafts.

There are a few things to keep in mind when selecting a lab coat. You want to look at the length. Some are shorter than others. These are ideal for an office setting. Longer coats help to keep more of the clothing and skin protected from chemicals and other fluids. The longer coat can also give more of a professional appearance while working with patients. You also need to think about the size of the coat. A smaller coat is form-fitting and more for those who only want to wear it while completing office work or while making basic rounds in a doctor's office or hospital instead of wearing the coat for physical activity. Dickies lab coats are often made of a soft material and are sometimes larger in size. They work well for people who are doing physical tasks during the day as the arms and waist area provide for easier movement.

When selecting the coat, think about the items that you will need to carry with you. Some have large pockets that will hold a small notebook, stethoscope and other small items that are needed on the job. Others only have one or two small pockets that might hold a pen, small pieces of paper or a flashlight if one is needed. Colors are generally neutral, most being white or beige so that they don't distract from the job.